Bhilar waterfall

Bhilar Waterfall, only viewed during monsoons, is believed to be the source of the Kundali River. Approximately 300 to 350 ft in height, Kundali River joins the Venna River at Sangam Mahuli near Satara.

Small waterfall but when water falls from rocks to down, different shore comes out. Water was so pure and white like milk and transparent too. There is small dam like place before the waterfall and a small place where u can sit and enjoy the whole scenic beauty around you. Rocks near waterfall were cut due to continuously flowing of water. A must visit place for all… Water falls only till December month.

'Book Village'

Bhilar, a village in the Satara district of Maharashtra, has embraced the tag of being the first ‘village of books’. The concept has been inspired by Britain’s Hay-on-Wye, a Welsh town known for its bookstores and literature festivals. ‘pustakanche gaon’, as it is known in Marathi, was set up as the village of books on May 4, 2017, and this government initiative was inaugurated by Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis. This village, spread over two kilometres, is located at a distance of eight kilometres from the hill station Panchgani.
Around 15,000 books (in Marathi) would be made available in the village premises. Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis will inaugurate the initiative ‘pustakanche gaon’ on May 4. Also, the state has provided several facilities such as chairs, tables, decorated umbrellas, and glass cupboards to local villagers to help them enhance the reading experience of literary connoisseurs visiting there.

The small village of Bhilar is about 250 kms from Mumbai and close to the twin hill-stations of Mahabaleshwar-Panchgani, in Maharashtra‘s ‘strawberry country’. It’s scenic, green most of the year and pink in the winter cropping season. Now it is being converted into a book village.
Led by Education minister Vinod Tawde, this project was undertaken by the Marathi Bhasha department wherein 25 locations around the village will turn into reader hot spots or mini-libraries. Seventy five artists have creatively designed the 25 locations with support from Asian Paints Ltd, he said.

Also, the state has provided several facilities such as chairs, tables, decorated umbrellas and glass cupboards to local villagers to help them enhance the reading experience of literary connoisseurs visiting there.

“The government has financed around 15,000 books to be kept there permanently for the public at around 25 key locations around the village of 600 families. Anybody can simply pick up a book of his/her choice, read for as long as they want and keep it back for the others,” explained Tawde.

The books range from literature, poetry, religion, women and children, history, environment, folk literature, biographies and autobiographies to festival specials reported IANS